Pelvic Solutions
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Kids

children

Kids incontinence
 

Day time wetting (Enuresis):

3-4% of children between the age of 4-12 years old present with enuresis but it tends to be twice as common in girls (Lane and Robertson, 1997).  Two thirds of day wetting children also wet at night, and it is important to correct daytime wetting first.

Leaking urine in the day is considered a problem over the age of five years. Children usually feel the urge very suddenly and last minute, and they may use a range of techniques to stop the flow of urine, including using the heel of the foot pressed up to stop the flow of urine. 

Urinary infections need to be ruled out by the child’s GP. To manage this problem our Pelvic Floor Physiotherapist may request you to keep a bladder diary which measures the volumes of fluid going in and urine going out. Treatment involves addressing any constipation, education about fluid intake, good bladder and bowel habits, bladder retraining and timed toileting. Our Physiotherapist will help guide you through treatment and answer questions you may have. 

Bedwetting (Nocturnal Enuresis):

Bedwetting is very common in children and can be effectively treated.  It affects approximately:

  • 15% of 5-year olds

  • 5% of 10-year olds

  • 2% of 15-year olds

  • 1% of adults may still have occasional problems (Continence NZ)

The causes can be varied but it tends to run in families.  It can be caused by constipation, an overactive bladder or undeveloped waking response to the bladder signals.  If your child has been dry for 6 months and then starts to wet again, has daytime wetting, or is wetting over the age of 7, then you should seek help.

Treatment involves addressing any constipation, education about fluid intake, good bladder and bowel habits, daytime bladder retraining and daytime timed toileting, and if necessary a supported bed alarm program.